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Theft & Property Offenses Archives

Defend yourself against allegations of looting in an emergency

If you are caught in a natural disaster, one of the last things you're going to worry about is the legal consequences of stealing when you need something to survive. When a natural disaster hits, one of the main questions people have is whether or not it's a crime to take things from stores. Looting is a criminal act in normal circumstances, but does that apply to taking groceries during a heavy flood or hurricane?

Theft is more than borrowing items without permission

Larceny and theft are sometimes considered to be the same under law, but some states still keep them separated. Larceny itself is the unlawful taking of someone else's property when he or she hasn't given you permission and with the intention to keep the property from the owner permanently. Theft is more broadly the taking of another person's property without his or her permission and with the intent to prevent the person from regaining his or her property permanently.

Vandalism can result in jail time and heavy fines

You thought it was funny to throw eggs at your teacher's car last night, and you weren't aware that they could cause actual damage to the paint. What you didn't know what that the teacher was prepared for acts like this and had a security camera installed on the property. Now, you not only have trouble at school, but you're also facing an arrest. You're already 18, so you're in deep trouble if the teacher decides he wants to press charges for the crime.

A theft charge: The penalties you may face for theft convictions

Theft is a charge that ranges in severity depending on a number of factors. For example, if you steal a candy bar, you shouldn't face the same charges as someone who steals a car. Sentencing ranges from repaying what you owe to facing time in prison.

Vandalizing property: You could face a felony or misdemeanor

It's easy to be persuaded by others that performing graffiti or defacing property in some way is a good idea. Maybe it's meant to be a joke or wasn't meant to cause harm, but the fact is that vandalism of any type is a criminal act. When you destroy or deface a property without permission, it's considered to be vandalism.

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